Power in the Protein

11
Nov

Power in the Protein

If you aspire to have a healthy and fit body, it is essential that you are mindful of the amount of protein your body needs to build and maintain muscle. Protein is the building block of muscle tissue and is necessary to thrive and preserve health. This is why “protein with every meal and snack” is part of our Healthy Habits Challenge this November. Most people would agree that protein is important, but may not know that it is beneficial for more than just muscle maintenance and growth.

Did you know that protein…

  • Reduces appetite and hunger levels
  • Boosts metabolism
  • Increases fat burning
  • Helps maintain weight loss
  • Can help with cravings and desires for late night snacks
  • Helps body repair after injury
  • Aids in maintaining fitness as you age

How much protein is enough?
The Dietary Reference Intake set by the Institute of Medicine(IOM) states that 0.36g of protein per pound of body weight is the minimum amount a sedentary individual should consume. For more active types, such as our community of CrossFitters, it is recommended that you eat up to twice that amount – .0.72g to 1g of protein per pound of body weight. 

How do I know if I am getting enough?
Not everyone has a scale to measure every gram of protein they plan to eat. An easy gauge of meat protein is to compare the portion to your palm. One palm size of meat is typically pretty close to a serving (look for more info on eyeing up portions in a later blog post!). Otherwise, read your labels! Keeping track will illuminate your daily eating habits in a completely new light – even if just for a week or so.

What should I eat to meet my quota of protein?
Whole foods are always the best source of macro and micro nutrients. But, with today’s whirlwind schedules and modern science, there are now a wide variety of items to boost your protein intake. 

High Protein Foods:

  • Chicken
  • Beef
  • Turkey
  • Dairy, such as cottage cheese, hard cheese, milk, and greek yogurt
  • Fish, such as tuna, salmon, and anchovies
  • Quinoa
  • Lentils and Beans
  • Ezekiel bread
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Veggies, such as: broccoli, brussel sprouts, green peas, asparagus, avocado, etc.
  • Quality protein powder or bars

When should I eat my protein?
Making a habit of eating or drinking protein within the first hour or two after a workout will provide your body with the tools it needs to build and recover your muscles. It is good practice to spread the rest of your protein throughout the remainder of your day.

We are so excited to be teaming up with our members to build healthy habits into their routines! One week down, three to go! Don’t forget to tag your photos and posts on social media with #CFRChallenge!

Post By Abi Williams